Criminology Between the Sheets: Gender Deviance and Society members host a Valentine’s Day themed book launch

As part of the University’s Scholars in the Spotlight event series, Alex Fanghanel, Emma Milne, Giulia Zampini, Stacy Banwell and Michael Fiddler hosted a book tour with a difference to launch the publication of their new textbook called Sex and Crime.

Taking the audience – which comprised people from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, including some out of academia – on a tour of their 15-chapter oeuvre, the authors hosted an interactive session in which they presented a few of the main themes of their work.

The audience was asked to grapple with complicated issues to do with sexual consent, sexual propriety, romance fraud, abortion, police surveillance, and institutional sexual violence. By collaborating with the audience using mentimeter, the authors demonstrated the critical, radical pedagogy that has been embedded throughout the textbook, which is one of the reasons why it stands out so much from the crowd as a pivotal text for undergraduate study.

The event was hosted on 12th February as a tongue in cheek and subversive way to link the event with Valentine’s Day. Indeed, a highlight of the evening was when Emma Milne reminded everyone not to get married, because any form of state sanctioned sexual practice was inherently capitalistic and exploitative in nature. Who says romance is dead in criminology?

A video of the event can be viewed here, the book can be purchased here, and the discount code is available at the end of the video.


Feedback from the event:

‘It was a very interesting, extremely well-structured evening’ – Prof Josh Davies

‘A really thought provoking and first class session. Real impact potential’ Prof Steven Haines

‘it was just so exceptional. It had all the elements of an event that stays with you’ Kristian Humble

AHRC Fellowship awarded to Dr Andrew Knight-Hill from School of Design

Audiovisual Space: Recontextualising Sound-Image Media

The Arts and Humanities Research Council have awarded Dr Andrew Knight-Hill a prestigious two-year Leadership Fellowship to support his research on sound in film and audiovisual media. Dr. Knight-Hill’s project engages Hollywood and UK based practitioners, seeking to open up new ways of discussing the roles of sound in film.

To keep up to date with the latest details of this project please subscribe to the SOUNDIMAGE mailing list: Subscribe here

Lead Research Organisation: University of GreenwichDepartment Name: Creative Prof. & Digital Arts, FACH

Organisations

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New from the School of Law and Criminology: A Unique Special Issue on the Right to Privacy

On 20 February 2019, a conference on the right to privacy was organised at the University of Greenwich, with the support of Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA). Subsequent to the conference, Dr Aysem Diker Vanberg and Dr Özgür Heval Çɪnar from School of Law and Criminology prepared a special issue on `The right to privacy in the digital age: different perspectives around the globe` which has now been published in the International Journal of Human Rights (Vol 25, Issue 1).

The right to privacy is one of the rights enshrined in international human rights law. However, with the increasing digitalisation of modern life, protecting one’s privacy has become more complicated, with both state and non-state organisations making frequent interventions in citizens’ private lives. In this special issue they focus on the right to privacy in the digital age with a view to see how it is implemented across the globe in different jurisdictions. This special issue is very unique as there have not been any publications with similar content covering the issue as extensively, which is a first in this regard. Links to each of the articles in the special issue are below, with contributions from the School of Law and Criminology’s Dr Kristian Humble, Dr Aysem Diker Vanberg, and Dr Özgür Heval Çɪnar:

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CREL Bites; a new video series launched by the Centre for Research & Enterprise in Language

Interested in studying different aspects of language, its acquisition, development, or its formal analysis or teaching? Then watch the new video series launched by the Centre for Research & Enterprise in Language; CREL Bites.

CREL members are involved in research and scholarly activities concerning any aspect of language, its acquisition, teaching and its interface. CREL Bites is a video series featuring members introducing their research areas to provide insights on inter-disciplinary links to language. The videos aim to stimulate discussion, knowledge-exchange and provide potential collaborations in and around language.

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The Gender, Deviance and Society Research Group was launched!

October 22nd marked the launch of the Gender, Deviance and Society (GDS) research group at the University of Greenwich and we marked the event with an online webinar.

Drawing together the research expertise of its leaders – Dr Stacy Banwell, Dr Alexandra Fanghanel, Dr Camille Stengel and Dr Giulia Zampini – GDS aims to push forward research innovation in gender-related matters through interdisciplinary approaches, horizontal leadership, and mentoring. We want to create a platform for all members of the group at all stages of their scholarship and research to come together and learn from each other.

The Gender, Deviance and Society (GDS) online launch webinar

The GDS launch focused on celebrating the publication of Dr Banwell’s monograph Gender and the Violence(s) of War and Armed Conflict: More Dangerous to be a Woman? The book is now out as an open access publication on Emerald Publishing. An animation of Dr Banwell’s book can be viewed here.

For this occasion, we were excited to be able to read one of our members’ work in full (academics struggle to find time to read these days, or at least to read slowly). We always support each other’s achievements, but we seldom have time to really dig deep into each other’s work and ideas, so reading Dr Banwell’s work was a privilege. And beyond that, witnessing her ideas come to life in the discussion and be delivered with enthusiasm and intellectual prowess was very exciting.

Venturing into the world of webinars for the first time posed some technical challenges, which we met with laughter and jokes (and some frantic emails and Team and WhatsApp messaging back and forth, which webinar chair Dr Stengel managed with an exemplary poker face).

Overall, we succeeded in keeping our audience during the 45 minutes question and answer-style webinar, where Dr Fanghanel and Dr Zampini “grilled” Dr Banwell with questions about her book. This was smoothly followed by some thought-provoking questions from the audience.

It was great to see a heterogeneous audience made up of students as well as scholars from other disciplines. This reflects the aims and objectives of the group to bring together scholars from different disciplines through affiliate membership and collaborations, as well as enabling research opportunities for young scholars.

GDS is planning an event in the spring of 2021 to discuss the soon-to-be published SAGE textbook Sex and Crime.

To join the group, or find out more, contact A.n.d.fanghanel@gre.ac.uk

Senior Lecturer in Criminology addresses COVID-19 and domestic abuse during lockdown

Violence Against Women and Girls Research Network

Dr Camille Stengel, Senior Lecture in Criminology at the University of Greenwich will be part of a panel for a webinar about COVID-19 and domestic abuse, taking place on 19th November, 10:30 – 11:30 (GMT) hosted by the Violence Against Women and Girls Research Network. During the webinar the lecturer will be speaking with Justice Studio and Solace Women’s Aid about a qualitative study conducted with victims and domestic abuse service providers during the first lockdown.

Confirmed Speakers:

Kathryn Royal (Surviving Economic Abuse)

Katrin Hohl (City University) & Kelly Johnson (Durham University)

Chiara Zappaterreno (Huddersfiled University)

Camille Stengel (University of Greenwich)

June Brawner (Justice Studio)

To reserve a ticket, access Eventbrite

SAVE THE DATE!

FSEG features in Cordis Magazine with GEO-SAFE project

The University of Greenwich’s own Fire Safety Engineering Group featured in The Community Research and Development Information Service (CORDIS) magazine.

Interviewed by the EU magazine, the leader of the FSEG Team, Professor Ed Galea gave an overview of the project, which was finalised in April 2020, including the challenges faced. GEO-SAFE is part of the multidisciplinary international project consisting of 107 researchers and end-users from 20 partners in 6 European countries (Spain, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom) and Australia in a wide range of disciplinary fields (mathematics, modelling, fire safety and behavioural psychology, etc). The researchers collaborated across areas of expertise and with end users to understand the planning, logistical and real-time needs for addressing wildfires

The aim of GEO-SAFE is to create a network enabling the two regions to exchange knowledge, ideas and experience, thus boosting the progress of wildfires knowledge and the related development of innovative methods for dealing efficiently with such fires.

The article can be read here

Congratulations to FSEG for stealing the spotlight!

Summer research update from the School of Law and Criminology

We may have been locked down for the Spring and Summer but that has not hindered the research activities of our resident lawyers and criminologists. There have been a number of exciting publications launched over recent months and here is a round-up of some of the highlights, with links to each publication included.

A new chapter has been published by Dr Camille Stengel titled ‘Creating safe spaces in dangerous places: ‘Chicks Day’ for women who inject drugs in Budapest, Hungary‘. Published by Routledge, this chapter forms part of an interdisciplinary collection examining the role played by alcohol, tobacco and other drugs in framing certain groups as ‘dangerous’.

Dr Alexandra Fanghanel has authored a new article called ‘On Being Ugly in Public: The Politics of the Grotesque in Naked Protests . Published in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, this article continues Alex’s innovative work around sexualised naked protest in public spaces.

Prof Olga Martin-Ortega and the Business, Human Rights and the Environment research group continue their march towards revolutionising the electronics industry in collaboration with the GoodElectronics Network and the Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations. Their recently published report proposes a new approach to the urgent need for disclosure and transparency in the global electronics industry, and you can read more about it here.

Dr Melissa Pepper has recently co-authored the article ‘Exploring the Role and Contribution of Police Support Volunteers in an English Constabulary‘. Published in Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, Melissa’s paper can be accessed here.

Perhaps one of the most topical publications in our update comes from Dr Maria Kaspersson who has recently contributed a chapter called ‘‘You Always Hurt the One You Love’: Homicide in a Domestic Context to the edited collection ‘Why We Kill: Understanding Violence Across Cultures and Disciplines’.

Finally, if audio content is what you’re here for then Dr Louise Hewitt has got you covered. Louise has recently launched her brand new Innocence Project London podcast where you can find an honest account of the organisation, how important their work is to a clinical legal education, and why it matters. You can find it here, and make sure you subscribe to catch every episode.

Women, Crime and Criminal Justice Network Paper Prize 2020


We’re delighted to announce that Dr Alexandra Fanghanel from the School of Law and Criminology has come first place in the Women, Crime and Criminal Justice Network (WCCJN) Paper Prize 2020 for her paper ‘Asking for it: BDSM sexual practice and the trouble of consent’.

The WCCJN is part of the British Society of Criminology and they exist ‘to support scholarship on women, crime and criminal justice, and to foster research of the highest standard. In addition to promoting scholarship on women, crime and criminal justice, the network also aims to support women as criminological scholars’ and you can find out more about them here. We hope you will join us in congratulating Alex on her worthy first place prize.

The Office of Undergraduate Research defies lockdown and launches its second publication

The Office of Undergraduate Research proudly presents its 2020 publication, in collaboration with Combined Sociology Students. The book, ‘When the Personal Gets Political: Linking Student’ Sociological Autobiographies to Broader Social and Political Contexts’  is the second edition of a series of collated Autobiographies  written by students and is available on request. Dr Louise Owusu-Kwarteng led the project.

Second edition

Simply put, we are in tricky times. Socially, political and economically, it has been like this for a while, 2020 has, however taken us to a whole new level. We’ve had COVID-19, the world wide global pandemic, which has had some serious ramifications for everyone. This has led to collective worries about our health, and that of others who are close to us. The lockdown meant we have not been able to see our families, in some cases for months. It has had a knock on effect for our students’ education, due to the switch to online teaching, which meant losing face to face contact with their tutors and peers.

For those who graduate this year, for many the lockdown means no physical graduation. There are concerns about opportunities for graduate employability, due to the downturn of the economy – also a result of the pandemic. Mental health is also a growing concern, especially since particularly since COVID. As noted in a Lancet case study, the mental health of the nation has deteriorated since the pandemic, largely because of the impacts of lockdown, fears of contracting the disease and loss of loved ones (www.lancet.com July 2020). Racism, though always prevalent in society, has reared its head in a virulent and violent way with the deaths of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, and many others due to police violence. Islamophobic hate crimes also continue, and like racism it operates at a micro and macro level, and on a day to day basis…