Punjab and World War One – Webinar hosted by Dr Gavin Rand

Read The Guardian article here


FREE EVENT
THURSDAY 11TH NOVEMBER 6PM (UK) REGISTER HERE

As the UK and the world commemorates the fallen this Remembrance Sunday some of the names and other details of half a million World War One (WWI) soldiers are finally coming to light. The records of hundreds of thousands of Indian Army troops from Punjab, a region now divided between India and Pakistan, which had lain in a forgotten archive are being made available to the public for the first time offering new information about the allied war effort.
 
Join the ‘Punjab and World War One’ team from UKPHA and the University of Greenwich this Thursday 11 November at 6pm as we share details of a unique collection of sources on Punjab’s role in the First World War – and what we’re doing to make them available to all.

This event is free but you need to register. 
 


If you’ve missed any of our previous talks, you can watch them on our YouTube channel here

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Risk and Health Communication during Covid-19: A Linguistic Landscape Analysis

Dr Erika Kalocsányiová (Centre for Research & Enterprise in Language) with colleagues from the Institute for Lifecourse Development have recently published a paper examining the amount, content, and prominence of Covid-19 signage in Hackney, a London borough severely hit by the first wave of the pandemic.

Having analysed 1288 signs collected between May and July 2020, results showed significant differences in Covid-19 signage between deprived and less deprived areas. These differences (e.g., in messaging about staying at home) have created inequalities in access to Covid-19 related health information and guidance. The paper also explores the changes in Covid-19 signage over time and the tailoring of risk and health messages to minority communities.

Read the full paper here

Impact for beginners: a new seminar series in FLAS

The end of the REF2021 cycle provides  an  opportunity to share and reflect on impact in the hope of developing more knowledgeable, proactive and collaborative strategies for the future of social research in our university.

Two FLAS based lecturers, Dr Elena Vacchelli (Centre of Applied Sociology Research) and Dr Giulia Zampini  (Gender, Deviance and Society Research Group) are working together to extend the legacy of a first collaboration event between the criminology based group and the Applied Sociology Research Centre which took place in 2018.  

“Impact for beginners” is a series of workshops, seminars and events unpacking “impact” with a view to support our understanding and practices while also establishing themed working groups. During the first talk in June 2021, Professor Claire Donovan  shared some pearls of experience and wise insights on the workings of impact. Professor Donovan, who joined Greenwich in 2020, has a fascinating background: her research and participation to the Technical Working Group on Research Impact in the Australian context directly contributed to influencing the design of the impact component of the 2014 REF strategy in the UK  (wow, impact on ‘impact’, people!). In this context, Professor Donovan was a strong advocate for the use of narrative impact case studies along with more quantitative indicators. She is  particularly invested in developing strategies for impact in social science and humanities research, which is at the core of FLAS’ impact practices. During the talk, Claire also pointed to the importance of knowledge co-production and embedding impact into project planning from the get-go. For more details, you can watch the talk here

In the second part of the webinar, participants were invited to share their experiences of making ‘impact’ happen. Ensuing discussions touched upon institutional enablers and barriers of impact. Some fascinating questions came up in the Q&A, such as the potential epistemic differences between what counts as impact in the humanities and social sciences’, understandings of and approaches to impact, as well as the subtle variations and overlaps between research impact, research beneficiaries, and knowledge exchange.

Towards the end of the online event, participants were asked what kind of working groups they would benefit from creating to generate collaboration and increase our confidence in tackling the multifarious impact agenda. Some participants expressed an interest in creating a working group with a specific focus on impact in the humanities. Others called for a working group centred on the ethics and practices of co-production. Others still proposed setting up a group on developing good impact case studies in the humanities and social sciences. These core areas of interest will be taken on board for the development of further “Impact for beginners” seminars in conversation with internal and external speakers.

If you missed the webinar but would like to be included in future events and any of these working groups, please contact l G.F.Zampini@greenwich.ac.uk and E.Vacchelli@greenwich.ac.uk.

Enjoy late summer nights with Over Lunan

University of Greenwich’s own Dr Andrew Knight- Hill invites you to the atmospheric ambisonic sound installation with elements of public memorial created by Angus Farquhar of Aproxima Arts with dramaturg Purni Morell, an event starting today and running until 19 September. The event is an outdoor promenade performance taking place on the beach and in the dunes of Lunan Bay and is designed to be enjoyed in a relaxed, socially distant environment. Presented in celebration of Scotland’s Year of Coasts and Waters 20/21 and generously supported by the Scottish Government, EventScotland, Creative Scotland, the William Grant Foundation and the Garfield Weston Foundation.

Tickets now on sale here

Violence Against Women and Girls at Home: Domestic Abuse and the Pandemic – a panel discussion with Dr Camille Stengel

Dr Camille Stengel, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, has been involved in a collaborative research project investigating the impact of the pandemic on both survivors of domestic abuse and charities that support survivors. She recently shared her personal reflections with another project partner during a conversation posted on their blog: Justice Studio Research: “When I needed you to protect me, you gave him more power instead.” Covid-19 Lockdown & Domestic Abuse | Justice Studio

As part of the Women’s Network webinar series on Gender Based Violence, on May 20th Dr Stengel will be joined by a panel of experts to discuss the impact of the pandemic on domestic abuse. Book your free ticket here.

International Summer School on Multilingualism

Organised by the Centre for Research and Enterprise in Language (CREL), University of Greenwich (UK) and the Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR), University of Southampton (UK) with the collaboration of the Center for Language Science (CLS) from Pennsylvania State University (USA).

This international summer school offers an immersive learning experience on multiple facets on multilingualism facilitated by scholars internationally recognised, and the opportunity to access international networks. The course is highly interactive and takes a holistic approach, covering topics that range from the theoretical underpinnings of language analysis, development and processing, to the quantitative analysis of the data. Classes and workshops will be delivered online over the course of one week. Registered participants will receive a link to course documentation including key readings, some to prepare prior to the lectures.

Teaching language: English

Location:  Online – participants will receive materials and links to courses

Early bird fee (up to 1st June): £250
Regular fee: £300

Book tickets here

For queries email: multilingualism_school@greenwich.ac.uk

Continue reading “International Summer School on Multilingualism”

Racism, Anti-Racism and Policing in Britain

Introduction
This course provides learners with knowledge of institutional racism in Britain in three key areas. First, the course will provide a historical understanding of the development of institutional racism in Britain.

Secondly, the course will demonstrate how institutional racism is identified and evidenced.

Thirdly, the programme will look at the development of organisations and movements which challenge institutional racism in Britain the 20th and 21st centuries.

Continue reading “Racism, Anti-Racism and Policing in Britain”

Criminology Between the Sheets: Gender Deviance and Society members host a Valentine’s Day themed book launch

As part of the University’s Scholars in the Spotlight event series, Alex Fanghanel, Emma Milne, Giulia Zampini, Stacy Banwell and Michael Fiddler hosted a book tour with a difference to launch the publication of their new textbook called Sex and Crime.

Taking the audience – which comprised people from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, including some out of academia – on a tour of their 15-chapter oeuvre, the authors hosted an interactive session in which they presented a few of the main themes of their work.

The audience was asked to grapple with complicated issues to do with sexual consent, sexual propriety, romance fraud, abortion, police surveillance, and institutional sexual violence. By collaborating with the audience using mentimeter, the authors demonstrated the critical, radical pedagogy that has been embedded throughout the textbook, which is one of the reasons why it stands out so much from the crowd as a pivotal text for undergraduate study.

The event was hosted on 12th February as a tongue in cheek and subversive way to link the event with Valentine’s Day. Indeed, a highlight of the evening was when Emma Milne reminded everyone not to get married, because any form of state sanctioned sexual practice was inherently capitalistic and exploitative in nature. Who says romance is dead in criminology?

A video of the event can be viewed here, the book can be purchased here, and the discount code is available at the end of the video.


Feedback from the event:

‘It was a very interesting, extremely well-structured evening’ – Prof Josh Davies

‘A really thought provoking and first class session. Real impact potential’ Prof Steven Haines

‘it was just so exceptional. It had all the elements of an event that stays with you’ Kristian Humble

AHRC Fellowship awarded to Dr Andrew Knight-Hill from School of Design

Audiovisual Space: Recontextualising Sound-Image Media

The Arts and Humanities Research Council have awarded Dr Andrew Knight-Hill a prestigious two-year Leadership Fellowship to support his research on sound in film and audiovisual media. Dr. Knight-Hill’s project engages Hollywood and UK based practitioners, seeking to open up new ways of discussing the roles of sound in film.

To keep up to date with the latest details of this project please subscribe to the SOUNDIMAGE mailing list: Subscribe here

Lead Research Organisation: University of GreenwichDepartment Name: Creative Prof. & Digital Arts, FACH

Organisations

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Fire Safety Engineering Group – FSEG received prestigious responses for our GEO-SAFE Project

From Europe to Australia: Borderless research produces innovative tools for wildfire management

A multidisciplinary team of researchers from six European countries and Australia have joined forces with firefighter agencies in developing new tools to address the global challenge of wildfires.
by CORDIS magazine

Continue reading “Fire Safety Engineering Group – FSEG received prestigious responses for our GEO-SAFE Project”