Dr Louise Owusu-Kwarteng and Dr Louise Hewitt join the humanitarian Together Book Project

Together: An anthology from the COVID-19 pandemic is the fundraiser book compiled by authors Dev Aditya and Dr Pauldy Otermans, two former Brunel students. The publication collects the global human experiences, emotions and stories from the time of the pandemic. The 100 contributors, from 5 continents, 50% BAME authors, express themselves through poems, prose, letters and art.

The project was created to support and fund movements, frontline services and initiatives, while fighting the COVID-19 virus. The main beneficiary in the UK is the National Health Service (NHS) with 90% allocation of funds raised and 10% is donated monthly to selected non-UK organisations in need of resources to perform their duties. Visit the website for more information and here to donate.

The book is available for pre-order on Amazon

Congratulations to both Scholars for making the University of Greenwich Community proud!

Landscape Architecture and Urbanism PhD Student creates amazing flip book

Professor Ed Wall proudly tweeted about the amazing work of one of his PhD students, who composed the flip book of The Landscapists AD. The book is available to buy online from Wiley or be accessed via Wiley Online Library. This is a great example of teacher / student collaboration at the University of Greenwich.

Congratulations to Professor Ed Wall for stealing the spotlight through mentorship!

New publication shows how ‘Studying in this England is wahala (trouble)’, by Dr Louise Owusu-Kwarteng

The article by Dr Louise Owusu-Kwarteng, recently featured in Studies in Higher Education Journal, analyses the challenges and benefits of being a West African – international student in the English Academic scenario.

The study, based on the experience of 12 West African (Nigeria, Ghana and Sierra Leone) students illustrates why ‘studying in this England is trouble’. If on one hand there is an underlying promise of a more successful career future with academic achievement accredited abroad, on the other, the contrasts in education systems, adjustment to a different culture, environment, cost of living, lifestyle and contrasting study pace can be a hard hit for some students. Nothing prepares them to this reality, it must be lived and experienced. Pessimism aside, this narrative is a clear contrast with that portrayed in the comedy film Coming to America but equally enlightening.

Dr Louise Owusu-Kwarteng cleverly achieves a Publication that draw us to reflect on the polarity of two very distinct education system – the Western world and Africa, while subtly creating awareness for this reality.

Enjoy the reading!

Researchers call for transparency on social media content moderation to combat Covid-19

There is little doubt over the great potential of melding artificial intelligence with digital epidemiology to combat Covid19 effectively: the study of large amounts of online published data ranging from social media posts to trending hashtags can aid health officials in their task to track outbreaks quickly and target responses. At the same time, large technology companies hold a wealth of unpublished information (private posts, search keywords, location and interaction data with contacts) that could help epidemiologists further. To this end, LETS Lab at the School of Law and Criminology has joined forces with a network of organisations and researchers in an open letter urging social media and content sharing platforms to archive material for research.

According to LETS Director, Dr Argyro Karanasiou, the lockdown policies imposed globally have boosted an unprecedented flow of information via online platforms used for social purposes. At the same time the ever familiar danger of spreading misinformation online is now met with solely automated means of moderating content online, which needs to be transparent and audible as it may well compromise free speech and privacy. The letter urges tech giants to archive such data so that they can be studied further “to evaluate the macro and micro level consequences of relying on automation to moderate content in a complex and evolving information environment. (…) It is essential that platforms preserve this data so that it can be made available to researchers and journalists and included in your transparency reports. The data will be invaluable to those working in public health, human rights, science and academia. It will be crucial to develop safeguards to address the privacy issues raised by new or longer data retention and by the sharing of information with third parties, but the need for immediate preservation is urgent.” 

The open letter has been published by Article19 and can be viewed here.

Congratulations to Dr Argyro Karanasiou for being an active voice and stealing the spotlight!

Mind the Gap – Social vs Physical distancing, a point of view from Professor Ed Galea

COVID-19 may have changed our lives forever. Why? It seems uniquely designed to create segregation, while attempting to nest us, confused? So am I.

Conflicting information on how to stay safe, protect yourself and others, is thrown at us every day; ‘stay home, go out, use a mask, don’t use it, outdoor exercise, no outdoor exercise’… At least, one thing we’re clear – keep your distance!

Luckily for us, Greenwich’s own Professor Ed Galea managed to give a different view on what is being said about social distancing and how to do it responsibly. The Professor writes a series of articles on LinkedIn that may just change our minds and behaviours when out and about.

Stay Home, Stay Safe, Save Lives!

Image credits: Prof Ed Galea

Mark O’Thomas interviews Vicky Featherstone, the Royal Court Theatre Artistic Director

In an interview with Vicky Featherstone, the first female Artistic Director of the Royal Court Theatre, Professor Mark O’Thomas, Pro Vice-Chancellor at the University of Greenwich discussed, among other things, the Royal Court’s relationship to social class, race, disadvantaged communities and, in particular, focuses on Featherstone’s artistic programme since taking charge at the Court in 2013.

The conversation between Mark O’Thomas and Vicky Featherstone is featured in the book chapter Community and Ownership: Uncovering New Voices at the Royal Court Theatre and highlights the importance of theatre in the context of current times.

The publication Redefining Theatre Communities: International Perspectives on Community-Conscious Theatre-Making, edited by Marco Galea, and Szabolcs Musca is available to purchase, as hard copy or kindle edition from Amazon

Alphabet poem: for kids! is the new book by Emily Critchley, Senior Lecturer at University of Greenwich

Congratulations to Dr Emily Critchley, who will launch a new book in Pickled Pepper Books, North London, this Wednesday 26th February.

The alphabet poem: for kids! is a collaborative, illustrated poetry book for both children and adults by Emily Critchley, Michael Kindellan and Alison Honey Woods.

This is a unique opportunity to listen to readings from Emily Critchley, Michael Kindellan & Jerome Martin, and have your copy signed.

All invited!

University of Greenwich PhD Student wins Curran Fellowships award

The University of Greenwich is proud to announce that PhD student Beth Gaskell has been awarded the Curran Fellowships. The grants were founded by pioneer researcher Eileen Curran to support primary source and archival research into the periodical press of 19th-century Britain and its empire. The 2020 Curran Fellowships include: Beth Gaskell, The History of Early Regimental Journals 

This grant will enable Beth to pursue her work on C19 military periodicals after her PhD, which is nearly completed.

More detail of the Curran Fellowships can be found at

http://rs4vp.org/awards/curran-fellowship/  

New year, New leaf

The first of a series of books created by the Applied Sociology Research Group in collaboration with the Office of Undergraduate Research, ‘Livin’ Our Best Lives’ is an autobiographical account of undergraduate students life experience. Special acknowledgement to Dr Louise Owusu-Kwarteng and Dr Ewa Sidorenko.

Students from the Sociology, Sociology & Psychology, Education Studies, Childhood & Youth Studies study programmes have contributed to the achievement of this page turner.

Copies will be made available on request, please email the Office of Undergraduate Research