Impact for beginners: a new seminar series in FLAS

The end of the REF2021 cycle provides  an  opportunity to share and reflect on impact in the hope of developing more knowledgeable, proactive and collaborative strategies for the future of social research in our university.

Two FLAS based lecturers, Dr Elena Vacchelli (Centre of Applied Sociology Research) and Dr Giulia Zampini  (Gender, Deviance and Society Research Group) are working together to extend the legacy of a first collaboration event between the criminology based group and the Applied Sociology Research Centre which took place in 2018.  

“Impact for beginners” is a series of workshops, seminars and events unpacking “impact” with a view to support our understanding and practices while also establishing themed working groups. During the first talk in June 2021, Professor Claire Donovan  shared some pearls of experience and wise insights on the workings of impact. Professor Donovan, who joined Greenwich in 2020, has a fascinating background: her research and participation to the Technical Working Group on Research Impact in the Australian context directly contributed to influencing the design of the impact component of the 2014 REF strategy in the UK  (wow, impact on ‘impact’, people!). In this context, Professor Donovan was a strong advocate for the use of narrative impact case studies along with more quantitative indicators. She is  particularly invested in developing strategies for impact in social science and humanities research, which is at the core of FLAS’ impact practices. During the talk, Claire also pointed to the importance of knowledge co-production and embedding impact into project planning from the get-go. For more details, you can watch the talk here

In the second part of the webinar, participants were invited to share their experiences of making ‘impact’ happen. Ensuing discussions touched upon institutional enablers and barriers of impact. Some fascinating questions came up in the Q&A, such as the potential epistemic differences between what counts as impact in the humanities and social sciences’, understandings of and approaches to impact, as well as the subtle variations and overlaps between research impact, research beneficiaries, and knowledge exchange.

Towards the end of the online event, participants were asked what kind of working groups they would benefit from creating to generate collaboration and increase our confidence in tackling the multifarious impact agenda. Some participants expressed an interest in creating a working group with a specific focus on impact in the humanities. Others called for a working group centred on the ethics and practices of co-production. Others still proposed setting up a group on developing good impact case studies in the humanities and social sciences. These core areas of interest will be taken on board for the development of further “Impact for beginners” seminars in conversation with internal and external speakers.

If you missed the webinar but would like to be included in future events and any of these working groups, please contact l G.F.Zampini@greenwich.ac.uk and E.Vacchelli@greenwich.ac.uk.

Enjoy late summer nights with Over Lunan

University of Greenwich’s own Dr Andrew Knight- Hill invites you to the atmospheric ambisonic sound installation with elements of public memorial created by Angus Farquhar of Aproxima Arts with dramaturg Purni Morell, an event starting today and running until 19 September. The event is an outdoor promenade performance taking place on the beach and in the dunes of Lunan Bay and is designed to be enjoyed in a relaxed, socially distant environment. Presented in celebration of Scotland’s Year of Coasts and Waters 20/21 and generously supported by the Scottish Government, EventScotland, Creative Scotland, the William Grant Foundation and the Garfield Weston Foundation.

Tickets now on sale here

Violence Against Women and Girls at Home: Domestic Abuse and the Pandemic – a panel discussion with Dr Camille Stengel

Dr Camille Stengel, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, has been involved in a collaborative research project investigating the impact of the pandemic on both survivors of domestic abuse and charities that support survivors. She recently shared her personal reflections with another project partner during a conversation posted on their blog: Justice Studio Research: “When I needed you to protect me, you gave him more power instead.” Covid-19 Lockdown & Domestic Abuse | Justice Studio

As part of the Women’s Network webinar series on Gender Based Violence, on May 20th Dr Stengel will be joined by a panel of experts to discuss the impact of the pandemic on domestic abuse. Book your free ticket here.

Criminology Between the Sheets: Gender Deviance and Society members host a Valentine’s Day themed book launch

As part of the University’s Scholars in the Spotlight event series, Alex Fanghanel, Emma Milne, Giulia Zampini, Stacy Banwell and Michael Fiddler hosted a book tour with a difference to launch the publication of their new textbook called Sex and Crime.

Taking the audience – which comprised people from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, including some out of academia – on a tour of their 15-chapter oeuvre, the authors hosted an interactive session in which they presented a few of the main themes of their work.

The audience was asked to grapple with complicated issues to do with sexual consent, sexual propriety, romance fraud, abortion, police surveillance, and institutional sexual violence. By collaborating with the audience using mentimeter, the authors demonstrated the critical, radical pedagogy that has been embedded throughout the textbook, which is one of the reasons why it stands out so much from the crowd as a pivotal text for undergraduate study.

The event was hosted on 12th February as a tongue in cheek and subversive way to link the event with Valentine’s Day. Indeed, a highlight of the evening was when Emma Milne reminded everyone not to get married, because any form of state sanctioned sexual practice was inherently capitalistic and exploitative in nature. Who says romance is dead in criminology?

A video of the event can be viewed here, the book can be purchased here, and the discount code is available at the end of the video.


Feedback from the event:

‘It was a very interesting, extremely well-structured evening’ – Prof Josh Davies

‘A really thought provoking and first class session. Real impact potential’ Prof Steven Haines

‘it was just so exceptional. It had all the elements of an event that stays with you’ Kristian Humble

Senior Lecturer in Criminology addresses COVID-19 and domestic abuse during lockdown

Violence Against Women and Girls Research Network

Dr Camille Stengel, Senior Lecture in Criminology at the University of Greenwich will be part of a panel for a webinar about COVID-19 and domestic abuse, taking place on 19th November, 10:30 – 11:30 (GMT) hosted by the Violence Against Women and Girls Research Network. During the webinar the lecturer will be speaking with Justice Studio and Solace Women’s Aid about a qualitative study conducted with victims and domestic abuse service providers during the first lockdown.

Confirmed Speakers:

Kathryn Royal (Surviving Economic Abuse)

Katrin Hohl (City University) & Kelly Johnson (Durham University)

Chiara Zappaterreno (Huddersfiled University)

Camille Stengel (University of Greenwich)

June Brawner (Justice Studio)

To reserve a ticket, access Eventbrite

SAVE THE DATE!

Black History Month, We Salute You!

Welcome to October!

It’s Black History Month and for 31 days we celebrate the history, the culture, the significance and the legacy of the African Diaspora movement. In the UK, October highlights the achievements of the people and events that created this black history. The University of Greenwich and it’s Community embraces the spirit and invites you to join a series of events organised by the Centre for Applied Sociology Research and the Greenwich Student Union that showcases the importance of this annual celebration. Tickets to these events can be reserved in advance.

2020 has, so far, been a year marked by events that will live in our memories for generations to come. As we sailor through uncertain waters, we hold on to the past and the present with more conviction, after all, it’s all we have as given. As the Autumn leaves start to fall, announcing the beginning of a new season, we restore hope and embrace the gift of life.

Happy Black History Month!

Let Our Legacy Continue: an exhibition for Black History Month, Oct 2-28

This week the Applied Sociology Research Group, the Drama, Theatre and Performance Research Group, University of Greenwich Galleries and the Caribbean Social Forum are launching a collaborative online and gallery exhibition running throughout October for Black History Month.

The exhibition is a truly unique experience combining technologies such as Zoom and the traditional gallery experience to tell a story, you will encounter a layered experience of video, audio and imagery. The li ve experience will be in the Stephen Lawrence Gallery, Stockwell Street, is expected to take no more than 45 minutes to travel through, and each ticketed session will be restricted to six attendees in line with COVID-19 regulations. There will also be an online version of the gallery launching for those who are shielding or would prefer to join online. For more information and tickets visit the University of Greenwich Galleries website here and read on for a taster of what to expect from the teams:

From the Caribbean to the UK to Lockdown, we carry and re-remember stories of where we came from, journeys and first impressions. We do what we have always done to survive and thrive. We adapt and refresh skills. We innovate, create and re-create. This project uses visual art, sound, music and words to capture and celebrate the rich material of our unique Caribbeaness as reflected in our everyday lives.

Our journey ends with an exhibition which we invite you to travel through, marking the beginning of a new adventure. This exhibition appears both in a digital format* and at The Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Both formats of the exhibition are open to the public from 2 October, after an invited launch on 1 October.

*The online exhibition will launch on October 23

PARTICIPANTS

Bernie Ferguson (Jamaica); Cynthia Gaynor-Bailey (Jamaica, Government Officer); Dolcie Gibbs (Jamaica, Nurse); Esther Precod (Barbados, Nurse); Fabian Best (Barbados, Nurse); Harry Franklyn (Barbados, Builder); Joycelyn Williams (Trinidad and Tobago, Entrepreneur); Denzil Winsburrow (St Vincent, Education); Neville McGregor (Jamaica, Builder); Sonia McIntosh, MBE (Jamaica, Civil Servant); Tony Durrant, MBE (St Vincent, Civil Servant); Velmar McGregor (Grenada, Education); Victor Turton (Barbados, Transport)

EXHIBITION TEAM

Adele Chambers (UoG Student Intern); Dave Hockham (Drama, Theatre and Performance Research Group, UoG); Ingrid Pollard, Dr. (Artist and Curator); Jean Campbell (Workshop Facilitator and Curator); Pamela Franklin (Caribbean Social Forum); Shamica Ruddock (Creative Digital Specialist); Tracey Reynolds, Prof. (Applied Sociology Research Group, UoG)

We all hope to see you there!

Jim Hobbs presents Moribund State[s] – Exhibition

The University of Greenwich Programme Leader for MA Digital Arts, Jim Hobbs has announced the opening of his exhibition Moribund State[s]from 1st August at Project 78, as the restart of their exhibition programme. The project has been 18 months in the making and is a perfect reflection of the ideology and intention of Project 78. The show will run until 29th August 2020.

For Moribund State(s), Hobbs has returned to his childhood home (Ohio, USA) in order to confront the place where one is originally from.  With a perspective that is only gained from a distance (in both time and space), he has gathered indigenous materials in order to forge a series of new works which poetically ascribe a familiar yet foreign place.

Victorian Popular Fiction Conference Returns to Greenwich

Over three days 15-17 July, the annual conference of the Victorian Popular Fiction Association (VPFA) was held by the University of Greenwich. It was the second year in a row that we held the conference  – the Association’s President is Professor Andrew King (HSS) – but the first it was held virtually. 103 delegates from 5 continents came together on Teams to discuss topics such as Medical Encounters, Science and the Supernatural, Vampires, Travel, and Disaster.

Professor Alexis Easley from the University of St Thomas, Minnesota, gave a stunningly researched paper which (literally) mapped and quantified the contributions of hundreds of women writers to the famous Chambers’s Journal, the first periodical to aim at a truly mass market in a modern sense. She showed how women were absolutely central to the founding of mass-market reading, and that, contrary to expectation, they suffered from less than a 3% pay discrimination. Such repositioning of women as core producers in the cultural industries and our narrative imaginary is fundamental to the VPFA’s mission, and almost all of the papers confirmed this.

A handful of the best papers will be selected for publication in Victorian Popular Fictions, the organ of the VPFA, edited by Andrew King and by Prof Mariaconcetta Costantini (University of Chieti-Pescara).

Conference participants

Conference delegates were unanimous that the conference was a great success: they were especially grateful that we found a way to go ahead when so many others have been cancelled or indefinitely postponed. Given the huge cuts in research budgets across the globe as well as the greener credentials of online conferences, what we have pioneered here may well be the way forward. In whatever form, planning for the 2021 conference at Greenwich is already underway. The successful conference was coordinated by Karen Ward from FLAS Research and Enterprise Support Office.

Congratulations to Professor Andrew King for stealing the online spotlight!