Category Archives: Ethnicity

Soul Cap: Afro swimming cap approved after Olympic ban

A swimming cap for afro hair has been approved for use in top-level competitions.

The specialised covering – designed for thick, curly hair and styles such as dreadlocks, weaves and braids – was banned from last year’s Olympics.

Manufacturer Soul Cap described the approval from governing body Fina as “a huge step in the right direction”.

“We’re excited to see the future of a sport that’s becoming more inclusive,” it said.

Fina executive director Brent Nowicki said the announcement “follows a period of review and discussion on cap design between Fina and Soul Cap over the past year”, in a statement reported by the Metro. More

Windrush Day: Queen praises pioneers as Waterloo statue unveiled

The Queen has praised the Windrush “pioneers” for their “profound contribution” to British life as a statue to them was unveiled.

The monument, at Waterloo Station, pays tribute to the thousands of people who arrived in the UK from Caribbean countries between 1948 and 1971.

It depicts a man, woman and child standing on top of suitcases and was revealed to mark Windrush Day.

The government gave £1m to fund the statue, designed by Basil Watson.

In a message to mark the occasion, signed Elizabeth R, the Queen said she hoped the statue would “inspire present and future generations” as she sent her “warmest good wishes on this historic occasion”.

Windrush Day marks the arrival of Caribbean immigrants to the shores of Britain on 22 June each year – the day HMT Empire Windrush arrived at Tilbury Docks in 1948. More

BBC Radio 3 to shine light on ‘forgotten’ composers

BBC Radio 3 is to premiere three forgotten orchestral works by composers from diverse ethnic backgrounds as part of an ongoing push to expand the classical repertoire.

Works by Margaret Bonds, Ali Osman and Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges will be heard for the first time in a broadcast on 2 February.

The concert is the first result of a year-long collaboration with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, which funded research into Black, Asian and ethnically diverse composers.

The seven researchers who were awarded funding last spring have been excavating pieces of music that have been rarely performed and, in some cases, never recorded. More

Joséphine Baker to be first black woman to enter France’s Panthéon

American-born French performer Joséphine Baker will be entered into Paris’ Panthéon mausoleum, making her the first black woman to receive the honour.

The government says Baker will be inducted into the monument in November.

The Panthéon is a burial place for celebrated French icons such as scientist Marie Curie and writer Victor Hugo.

Baker will be just the sixth woman to join some 80 national heroes.

Born in St Louis, Missouri in 1906, Baker rose to international stardom in the 1930s after moving to France to pursue a career in showbusiness.

She was also a resistance fighter for her adopted country France during World War Two, and had a role in the civil rights movement in the US. More

King’s Cross: Plaque unveiled for Britain’s first black train driver

A plaque has been unveiled commemorating Britain’s first black train driver.

Jamaican-born Wilston Samuel Jackson began maintaining trains shortly after moving to London in 1952, and became a driver 10 years later.

He had a long and successful career on the railway, including driving the famous Flying Scotsman locomotive.

At the unveiling at King’s Cross station, Mr Jackson’s daughter said he “dedicated his life to the railway”.

“He was never late or missed a day, and he was so proud of his work, despite the many challenges he faced,” Polly Jackson said.

“Today was a fitting tribute to his life and career.” More

First new treatment for sickle cell in 20 years

The first new sickle-cell treatment in 20 years will help keep thousands of people out of hospital over the next three years, NHS England has said.

Sickle-cell disease is incurable and affects 15,000 people in the UK.

And the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence said the hope of reducing health inequalities for black people, who are predominantly affected and often have poorer health to start with, made the drug worth recommending.

It called it “an innovative treatment”. More

Join our BAME Staff Network’s UNITE Week: 24-28 May 2021

From 24 to 28 May 2021, the BAME Staff Network is organising and taking part in a series of events to mark the anniversary of the killing of George Floyd on 25 May 2020. This hurtful and traumatising event has been a catalyst for many to acknowledge the presence of structural racism in our communities and universities. And the BAME Staff Network continues to voice our concerns about racial discrimination and disparity within our institution. However, the racial reckoning is far from being accomplished.

The BAME Staff Network is playing an active role in driving cultural change for inclusion of BAME staff across all spheres of the university.

Join the events and let us make an impact together.

Afro wigs: Norfolk hair donor proud of ‘historic breakthrough’

A girl who was originally told her afro hair was unsuitable for children’s wigs said she was “really proud” her locks were now being used.

Carly Gorton, 11, from Norfolk, had urged the Little Princess Trust charity to rethink after it said afro hair was too delicate for wig-making.

It said wigs were now possible after research and a trial, and described them as a “historic breakthrough”.

“It’s really beautiful,” said Carly, of one of the new creations.

The charity provides wigs made from real hair for children who have lost their own due to cancer treatment or for other reasons.

Carly wanted to donate some of her hair but was originally told last year that it was not suitable.

After pressing the charity to look again at the issue, prototypes were developed and approved for use. More

Joining together to mark Ramadan 2021

Today we are marking the start of Ramadan one of the holiest months of the Islamic lunar calendar. If you’re not observing Ramadan you may like to join our Do a Good Deed for Ramadan.

السَّلاَمُ عَلَيْكُمْ وَرَحْمَةُ اللهِ وَبَرَكَاتُهُ

As-salamu alaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh (“May the peace, mercy, and blessings of Allah be with you”)

Here at Greenwich, we want to mark the start of Ramadan by wishing everyone taking part Ramadan Mubarak and Ramadan Kareem.

We know this year, once again that Ramadan will be a different experience as attending mosques may be limited and connecting with friends and family indoors will not be possible. We want to ensure everyone taking part in Ramadan this year has a safe and connected experience and as a university community we want to come together, in the spirit of Ramadan. More

Sunny and Bhupinder Gill are first Asian brothers appointed for same EFL game

Sunny and Bhupinder Gill have become the first South Asian brothers to be appointed on the same officiating team for an English Football League game.

Bhupinder will be the assistant and Sunny the fourth official for the Championship match between Bristol City and Nottingham Forest on Saturday.

The pair, who are Sikh, are the sons of former EFL referee Jarnail Singh, who retired in 2010.

“It’s a proud moment for the family,” Bhupinder told BBC Sport. More